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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Economic feasibility of mechanical strawberry harvesting in Oregon found in the catalog.

Economic feasibility of mechanical strawberry harvesting in Oregon

Ahmed M. Hussen

Economic feasibility of mechanical strawberry harvesting in Oregon

estimated private and social benefits and costs

by Ahmed M. Hussen

  • 153 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Strawberries -- Harvesting -- Economic aspects.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Ahmed M. Hussen.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[11], 123 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages123
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15068916M

      Han-Sup et al. () concluded that harvesting costs for small-diameter trees increased with decreasing tree size, and forest harvesting systems used greatly affects economic feasibility of small wood harvesting, but these results were based on fixed harvesting intensities and only for trees in southwest Idaho.   Vanilla is a tropical climbing vine of the orchid family, grown for its pleasant flavor. Vanilla is one of the costliest spices in the market after saffron and grows with the support of bark of trees. There are more than 40 species of vanilla exist. However, only three of them are considered as important ones.

    Strawberry harvesting, one of the most labor-intensive operations in production agriculture, is becoming less so. A recently developed machine has altered the harvest system in a sizable share of Ventura County, California, acreage this year, and it appears headed for wide adoption.   African blackwood (ABW) (Dalbergia melanoxylon) mainly occurs in the coastal areas of East Africa, including in Tanzania and Mozambique, and its heartwood is commonly known to be one of the most valuable materials used in the production of musical instruments. Although the heartwood is one of the most expensive timbers in the world, very low material Cited by: 1.

    Harvesting is the process of gathering a ripe crop from the fields. Reaping is the cutting of grain or pulse for harvest, typically using a scythe, sickle, or reaper. On smaller farms with minimal mechanization, harvesting is the most labor-intensive activity of the growing large mechanized farms, harvesting utilizes the most expensive and sophisticated farm machinery, . Journal of Energy and Power Technology (JEPT) is an international peer-reviewed Open Access journal published quarterly online by LIDSEN Publishing Inc. This periodical is dedicated to providing a unique, peer-reviewed, multi-disciplinary platform for researchers, scientists and engineers in academia, research institutions, government agencies and industry.


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Economic feasibility of mechanical strawberry harvesting in Oregon by Ahmed M. Hussen Download PDF EPUB FB2

The principal objective of this thesis has been to evaluate the economic feasibility of mechanical strawberry harvest in Oregon. As demonstrated in Chapter V, depending on the assumptions about the quality and the average yield of the strawberry varieties that would eventually be harvested mechanically, and the efficiency of the harvester; the expected savings per acre to the strawberry growers from the use of mechanical harvester Cited by: 3.

Title: ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF MECHANICAL STRAWBERRY HARVESTING IN OREGON: ESTIMATED PRIVATE AND SOCIAL BENEFITS AND COSTS Abstract approved: William G. Brown At its peak, Oregon produced 21 percent of the nation's total commercial strawberry production. However, since 19 71, Oregon's share of strawberry production.

Thus, in order to alleviate\ud the problems associated with harvest cost, since ,\ud Oregon has been actively seeking to mechanize its strawberry\ud harvest.\ud The principal objective Economic feasibility of mechanical strawberry harvesting in Oregon book this thesis has been to\ud evaluate the economic feasibility of mechanical strawberry\ud harvest in Oregon.

Pressure to explore the breeding of new cultivars for mechanical harvesting and handling came in from the Oregon strawberry industry. Also, the Oregon Strawberry Commission, formed inidentified mechanical harvesting as its first major research objective.

As a result, a major portion of the long-term cooperative USDA-Oregon Agri. Oregon strawberry acreage and production. In an attempt to solve these problems, since Oregon has put considerable efforts into mechaniz-ation of strawberry harvesting.

The objectives of this thesis are to estimate the economic feasibility to Oregon growers of mechanically har. The objectives of this thesis are to\ud estimate the economic feasibility to Oregon growers of mechanically harvested\ud strawberries, and to estimate net social benefits (or costs) that\ud could be expected from adopting this new technology in strawberry harvesting.\ud The structural model consisting of supply and demand for strawberries\ud.

A Field-Scale Technical and Economic Evaluation of Strawberry Mechanical Harvest, Handling and Processing." Proposal Submitted to the North Regional Commission, (). Economic Feasibility of Mechanical Strawberry Harvesting in Oregon: Estimated Private and Social Benefits and Costs."Author: Ahmed M.

Hussen. Growing strawberries is a great alternative for family farms, and it is possible to obtain a good financial return on a small property. Economic feasibility of strawberry production in. The economic feasibility of small wood harvesting and utilization in southwest Idaho was examined by Han et al.

Results indicated that markets for. Economic feasibility of an integrated harvesting system for small-diameter trees in southwest Idaho. Forest Prod. 54(2) Hiesl, P. and J. Benjamin. The renewed interest is a result of increased economic demand for better solutions for selective automated citrus harvesting than are currently available by purely mechanical harvesters.

Professor and Timber Harvesting Extension Specialist Oregon State University Corvallis, ORUSA Abstract. Describes brief history and origin of Oregon's Forest Practice Act (FPA). Lists reasons for increasing forest regulation. Explains concepts of feasibility for the FPA as technical, economic, and institutional.

For successful robotic harvesting the robot must detect the fruit, reach the fruit, determine if the fruit is mature, detach the mature fruit from the plant, and transfer it to a container (Sarig, ).The main performance indicators that depend on the crop design, and that influence robotic harvesting, correspond to these steps (): fruit location success, detachment success, harvest Author: Liesbet van Herck, Polina Kurtser, Lieve Wittemans, Yael Edan.

Introduction Nowadays, the technology of mechanical harvesting is focused on harvesting plants of large crops (e.g. wheat, corn) using special mowers of large size and cost. On the other hand, in spite of the great technological advances, the harvesting of vegetables, fruits and other corps (e.g.

saffron) depends primarily on human by: 5. Good Agricultural Practices for greenhouse vegetable crops Editorial board: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Plant Production and Protection Division Wilfried Baudoin, Remi Nono-Womdim, NeBambi Lutaladio, Alison Hodder International Society for Horticultural Science Commission Protected Cultivation.

greenhouse industry showed that approximately 99 percent of the greenhouse area in Alberta is under commercial production, with the balance confined to institutions such as universities, research stations and Size: 1MB. production. The hand harvest full production budget assumes that growers will machine pick a final “clean-up” pass at the end of the harvest season for the process market.

16) This study assumes the organic blueberry fresh market price is $ per lb. and the processed market price is $ per lb. (based on typical prices inFile Size: KB.

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These studies focused on mechanical aspects of the design (locomotion, etc.) or general productivity. Starting in the s, presentations appeared in the Western US horticultural associations regarding prone mobile strawberry picking platforms (Biringer, ). This study confirmed the productivity and preference of workers for the prone by: Long-term effects of wet and dry site harvesting on soil physical properties mitigated by mechanical site preparation in coastal plain loblolly pine.

‘mother’, eventually growing its own flowers, leaves, and stolon (Martin and TepeDavis ). The strawberry ‘fruit’ is not actually a berry but instead a receptacle for potentially hundreds of tiny fruits, known as achenes. Flowers have five or .FynbosFarm hydroponics farm business plan executive summary.

FynbosFarm is a new hydroponics facility in South Africa. It will grow tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers in hydroponic tunnels for export, and instant turf in the open for the local market.Saffron is a crop traditionally harvested by hand and hence this paper explores the feasibility of mechanisation of the harvest procedure.

A conceptual machine has been designed which operates by separating a) the tepals and b) the stigmas and stamens from the plant individually in the field using a combination of pneumatic and mechanical.